Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

MLA Micro-course

Using hands-on practice, learn how to create in-text and Works Cited citations, as well as craft paraphrases and summaries of source material.

In addition to paying attention to the "Questions to Consider" section at the top of each page within this course, here are some examples to practice creating MLA citations. View each source and then construct what is asked using a separate piece of paper or word document. Then, check your work against the answers linked at the bottom.

Warning: the 'Cite' feature in many library databases often contains small errors; do not rely on that for accurate citations.

1. Create an MLA in-text citation, using a signal phrase, for the following made-up source quote (assume you will put the quote into a paper and cite it):

"immigrant family separations at the border increased by 42.5% in FY 2017"

from: Immigration and the Refugee Crisis in America, by Inez B. Dross, 2019. New York: Belle Publishing. Page 96.

 

2. View the following information source and then create an MLA Works Cited entry for it: https://www.guttmacher.org/fact-sheet/unintended-pregnancy-united-states

 

3. View the following information source and then create an MLA Works Cited entry for it: https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/empire-ebooks/detail.action?docID=3417275

 

4. View the following information source and then create an MLA Works Cited entry for it: http://library.esc.edu/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=130938925&site=eds-live

 

5. Read the following passage carefully and then create a paraphrase of the main idea, that also includes an MLA in-text citation, using a signal phrase:

Boys who watched more superhero media had higher rates of playing with pretend weapons, as well as higher rates of playing in stereotypically male ways (play wrestling, for example, versus playing dress-up). This was true even after the researchers controlled for the level of boyish play at the first time point, showing that increased levels of boyish play followed after watching more superhero shows. The researchers also controlled for television violence exposure in general.

Superheroes didn't influence girls' levels of gendered play, but did make them more likely to play with weapons...

from: Pappas, Stephanie,. "Do Superheroes Model Damaging Gender Roles to Kids?" Live Science, June 18, 2014, www.livescience.com/46380-superheroes-and-violent-play.html, accessed 4 April, 2019.